HKU POP releases popularity figures of CE and principal officialsBack

 

Press Release on July 11, 2017

| Detailed Findings (Rating of Chief Executive Carrie Lam ) | Detailed Findings (Popularity of Principal Officials) |

Special Announcements

1. Robert Chung, the Director of Public Opinion Programme (POP) of The University of Hong Kong, publishes the last article of his series “HKSAR 20th Anniversary Series” in his column “Chung’s Blunt Words” today. Entitled “Hong Kong independence is not a problem”, the article advices Carrie Lam to adopt the attitude of “patience rather than rashness” and “no independence” principle when handling matters concerning Hong Kong independence. The article has been published in his online column “Chung’s Blunt Words” (www.facebook.com/ChungsBluntWords). The copyrights of all articles are open to the world, the media are welcome to re-publish the article in full or in part, early or concurrent publication can also be arranged.

2. From July 2017, apart from sampling landline numbers to conduct opinion surveys, mobile numbers are also added to the sampling frame. Since it takes time to conduct further testing, the figures released today by POP are only based on the landline sample. The results of the mixed sample will be released after further testing is completed. Meanwhile, POP also enhanced the previous weighting method that has been used for quite a few years. Apart from age, gender and education, economic activity status is now also taken into account when adjusting data. The latest figures released today have been rim-weighted according to provisional figures obtained from the Census and Statistics Department regarding the gender-age distribution of the Hong Kong population in 2016 year-end, the educational attainment (highest level attended) distribution and the economic activity status distribution collected in the 2011 Census.

3. In January 2007, POP opened a feature page called “Opinion Daily” at the “POP Site”, to record significant events and selected polling figures on a day-to-day basis. In July 2007, POP started collaborating with Wisers Information Limited whereby Wisers supplies to POP each day starting from July 24, a record of significant events of that day, according to the research method designed by POP. These daily entries would be uploaded to “Opinion Daily” as soon as they are verified by POP. A decade later, in July 2017, POP started collaborating with uMax Data Technology Limited to conduct “Online Opinion Analysis”. uMax Data would provide technical support concerning social big data to track posts in Facebook pages and various major forums in Hong Kong that mentioned specific political figures or organizations. When public opinion changes very significantly, POP will summarize the popular online posts about the specific political figures or organizations between the two surveys and compile a list of related events. Readers could make their own judgment if the events listed have impact on the related public opinion figures.

4. To facilitate academic study and rational discussion, POP has already released for public examination some time ago via the “HKU POP SITE” (http://hkupop.hku.hk) the raw data of all regular rating surveys of former CEs CH Tung, Donald Tsang and CY Leung, along with related demographics of respondents. POP today releases the raw data of the first CE rating survey of Carrie Lam after she took office. Please follow normal academic standards when using or citing such data.

Abstract

POP interviewed 832 Hong Kong people between 3 and 6 July, 2017 by means of a random telephone survey conducted by real interviewers. Our latest survey conducted after the new cabinet of Carrie Lam has taken office shows that the popularity rating of CE Carrie Lam has increased dramatically by 11.5 marks to 63.7 as compared to two weeks ago. Her latest approval rate is 52%, disapproval rate 34%, giving a net popularity of positive 19 percentage points, which has also gone up dramatically by 15 percentage point as compared to two weeks ago. Both her popularity rating and net approval rate are at record high since she was elected. As for the Secretaries of Departments, the latest support rating of CS Matthew Cheung is 57.6 marks. His approval rate is 39%, disapproval rate 18%, giving a net popularity of positive 21 percentage points. The latest support rating of FS Paul Chan is 40.5 marks, approval rate 22%, disapproval rate 41%, thus a net popularity of negative 19 percentage points. As for SJ Rimsky Yuen, his support rating is 52.8 marks, approval rate 37%, disapproval rate 23%, giving a net popularity of positive 14 percentage points. In terms of popularity rating and approval rate, Matthew Cheung continues to be the most popular Secretary of Department. As for the Directors of Bureaux, only 3 of the 13 are re-appointed Directors, compared to one month ago, the net approval rates of Secretary for Home Affairs Lau Kong-wah, Secretary for Innovation and Technology Nicholas Yang and Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing have all gone up substantively, by 15, 14 and 8 percentage points respectively. Among all the Directors, only Lau Kong-wah registers negative popularity, at negative 10 percentage points. Law Chi-kwong is currently the most popular Director, with a net approval rate of positive 44 percentage points. According to POP’s standard, no one falls under the category of “ideal” performer, Carrie Lam and Law Chi-kwong fall under the category of “successful” performer. The performance of Edward Yau, Wong Kam-sing, Joshua Law, Matthew Cheung, Rimsky Yuen, Lau Kong-wah and Paul Chan can be labeled as “mediocre”. That of Sophia Chan, John Lee, Kevin Yeung, Nicholas Yang, Michael Wong, Frank Chan, James Lau and Patrick Nip can be labeled as “inconspicuous”. No one falls into the category of “depressing” or “disastrous”. The maximum sampling error of all approval and disapproval rates is +/-5 percentage points at 95% confidence level, while the sampling errors of rating figures and net approval rates need another calculation. The response rate of the survey is 71%.

Points to note:

[1] The address of the “HKU POP SITE” is http://hkupop.hku.hk, journalists can check out the details of the survey there.

[2] The sample size of this survey is 832 successful interviews, not 832 x 71.5% response rate. In the past, many media made this mistake.

[3] “95% confidence level” means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. When quoting these figures, journalists can state “sampling error of rating not more than +/-2.7, sampling error of percentages not more than +/-5%, and sampling error of net values not more than +/-7% at 95% confidence level”.

[4] Because of sampling errors in conducting the survey(s) and the rounding procedures in processing the data, the figures cannot be too precise, and the totals may not be completely accurate. Therefore, when quoting percentages of the survey(s), journalists should refrain from reporting decimal places, but when quoting the rating figures, one decimal place can be used.

[5] The data of this survey is collected by means of random telephone interviews conducted by real interviewers, not by any interactive voice system (IVS). If a research organization uses “computerized random telephone survey” to camouflage its IVS operation, it should be considered unprofessional.


Latest Figures

POP today releases the latest popularity figures of CE Carrie Lam and various Secretaries of Departments and Directors of Bureaux under the accountability system. From July 2017, POP enhanced the previous weighting method that has been used for quite a few years. Apart from age, gender and education, economic activity group is now also taken into account when adjusting data. The latest figures released today have been rim-weighted according to provisional figures obtained from the Census and Statistics Department regarding the gender-age distribution of the Hong Kong population in 2016 year-end, the educational attainment (highest level attended) distribution and the economic activity status distribution collected in the 2011 Census. Herewith the contact information for the latest survey excluding the 204 testing samples using mobile numbers:

Date of survey

Overall sample size

Response rate

Maximum sampling error of percentages[6]

3-6/7/2017

832

71.5%

+/-3%

[6] Errors are calculated at 95% confidence level using full sample size. “95% confidence level” means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Questions using only sub-samples would have bigger sampling error. Sampling errors of ratings and net approval rates are calculated according to the distribution of the scores collected.


As different questions involve different sub-samples, the sampling errors will vary accordingly. The table below briefly shows the relationship between sample size and maximum sampling errors for the readers to capture the corresponding changes:

Sample size

(total sample or sub-sample)

Sampling error of percentages[7]

(maximum values)

Sample size

(total sample or sub-sample)

Sampling error of percentages[7]

(maximum values)

1,300

+/- 2.8%

1,350

+/- 2.7%

1,200

+/- 2.9%

1,250

+/- 2.8%

1,100

+/- 3.0%

1,150

+/- 3.0%

1,000

+/- 3.2%

1,050

+/- 3.1%

900

+/- 3.3%

950

+/- 3.2%

800

+/- 3.5%

850

+/- 3.4%

700

+/- 3.8%

750

+/- 3.7%

600

+/- 4.1%

650

+/- 3.9%

500

+/- 4.5%

550

+/- 4.3%

400

+/- 5.0%

450

+/- 4.7%

[7] Based on 95% confidence interval.


Recent popularity figures of CE Carrie Lam are summarized as follows:

Date of survey

24-27/4/17

8-11/5/17

22-25/5/17

5-8/6/17

19-22/6/17

3-6/7/17

Latest change

Sample base

1,006

1,004

1,003

1,036

1,007

832

--

Overall response rate

71.4%

72.1%

69.7%

69.4%

71.2%

71.5%

--

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding and error [8]

--

Rating of CE Carrie Lam

52.6[9]

56.7[9]

54.0[9]

54.7

52.2[9]

63.7+/-1.8

+11.5[9]

Vote of confidence in CE Carrie Lam

42%[9]

47%[9]

46%

49%

45%[9]

52+/-3%

+7%[9]

Vote of no confidence in CE Carrie Lam

49%

44%[9]

45%

44%

41%

34+/-3%

-7%[9]

Net approval rate

-7%[9]

3%[9]

<1%

6%

4%

19+/-6%

+15%[9]

[8] All error figures in the table are calculated at 95% confidence level. “95% confidence level” means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Media can state “sampling error of rating not more than +/-1.8, sampling error of percentages not more than +/-3%, sampling error of net approval rates not more than +/-6% at 95% confidence level” when quoting the above figures. The error margin of previous survey can be found at the POP Site.

[9] Such changes have gone beyond the sampling errors at the 95% confidence level, meaning that they are statistically significant prima facie. However, whether numerical differences are statistically significant or not is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful. (Postscript: Previous survey figures were not weighted by economic activity status, so comparisons were not made using “the same weighting method” as written in the original release, although the results are basically the same.)


Recent popularity figures of the three Secretaries of Departments under the accountability system are summarized below:

Date of survey

22/2/17[10]

6-10/3/17

3-6/4/17

8-11/5/17

5-8/6/17

3-6/7/17

Latest change

Sample base[10]

559

497-688

571-601

542-624

633-668

484-557

--

Overall response rate

64.4%

69.8%

73.1%

72.1%

69.4%

71.5%

--

Latest finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding & error [11]

--

Rating of CS Matthew Cheung

--

52.5[12]

51.3

55.3[12]

49.3[12]

57.6+/-2.0

+8.3[12]

Vote of confidence in
CS Matthew Cheung

--

28%

31%

35%

26%[12]

39+/-4%

+13%[12]

Vote of no confidence in
CS Matthew Cheung

--

15%

17%

18%

18%

18+/-3%

--

Net approval rate

--

13%

14%

17%

8%[12]

21+/-6%

+13%[12]

Rating of FS Paul Chan

47.4[12]

38.0[12]

37.2

39.7[12]

34.1[12]

40.5+/-2.7

+6.4[12]

Vote of confidence in FS Paul Chan

30%[12]

21%[12]

16%[12]

21%[12]

18%

22+/-4%

+4%

Vote of no confidence in FS Paul Chan

26%[12]

44%[12]

49%[12]

49%

48%

41+/-4%

-7%[12]

Net approval rate

4%[12]

-24%[12]

-33%[12]

-27%

-30%

-19+/-7%

+11%[12]

Rating of SJ Rimsky Yuen

--

44.4

47.3[12]

47.3

46.6

52.8+/-2.4

+6.2[12]

Vote of confidence in SJ Rimsky Yuen

--

27%

30%

27%

30%

37+/-4%

+7%[12]

Vote of no confidence in SJ Rimsky Yuen

--

34%

30%

32%

30%

23+/-4%

-7%[12]

Net approval rate

--

-7%

-1%

-5%

-1%

14+/-7%

+15%[12]

[10] The frequency of this series of questions is different from that of CE popularity ratings. Comparisons, if made, should be synchronized using the same intervals. Starting from 2011, these questions only uses sub-samples of the tracking surveys concerned, the sample size for each question also varies. The survey conducted on 22/2/2017 was the Budget instant survey and only asked rating of FS as well as his vote of confidence.

[11] All error figures in the table are calculated at 95% confidence level. “95% confidence level” means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Media can state “sampling error of various ratings not more than +/-2.7, sampling error of percentages not more than +/-4%, sampling error of net approval rates not more than +/-7% at 95% confidence level” when quoting the above figures. The error margin of previous survey can be found at the POP Site.

[12] Such changes have gone beyond the sampling errors at the 95% confidence level, meaning that they are statistically significant prima facie. However, whether numerical differences are statistically significant or not is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful. (Postscript: Previous survey figures were not weighted by economic activity status, so comparisons were not made using “the same weighting method” as written in the original release, although the results are basically the same.)


Latest popularity figures of Directors of Bureaux under the accountability system are summarized below, in descending order of net approval rates:

Date of survey

8-11/5/17

5-8/6/17

3-6/7/17

Latest change

Sample base [13]

585-628

591-655

491-544

--

Overall response rate

72.1%

69.4%

71.5%

--

Sample base for each question /
Percentage of answer

Base

%

Base

%

Base

% &
error [14]

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Labour and Welfare Law Chi-kwong

--

--

--

--

544

52+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Labour and Welfare Law Chi-kwong

--

--

--

--

544

8+/-2%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

544

44+/-6%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Edward Yau

--

--

--

--

517

48+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Edward Yau

--

--

--

--

517

7+/-2%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

517

41+/-6%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Food and Health Sophia Chan

--

--

--

--

517

42+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Food and Health Sophia Chan

--

--

--

--

517

3+/-2%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

517

38+/-5%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for the Civil Service Joshua Law

--

--

--

--

524

43+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for the Civil Service Joshua Law

--

--

--

--

524

8+/-2%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

524

35+/-6%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing

608

37%[15]

591

38%

491

45+/-5%

+7%[15]

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing

608

23%

591

18%[15]

491

17+/-3%

-1%

Net approval rate

608

14%[15]

591

20%

491

28+/-7%[16]

+8%[15]

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Security John Lee

--

--

--

--

494

34+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Security John Lee

--

--

--

--

494

7+/-2%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

494

28+/-5%[16]

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung

--

--

--

--

531

30+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung

--

--

--

--

531

9+/-3%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

531

21+/-5%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Development Michael Wong

--

--

--

--

502

28+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Development Michael Wong

--

--

--

--

502

8+/-2%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

502

20+/-5%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury James Lau

--

--

--

--

499

24+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury James Lau

--

--

--

--

499

6+/-2%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

499

19+/-5%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Transport and Housing Frank Chan

--

--

--

--

492

25+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Transport and Housing Frank Chan

--

--

--

--

492

6+/-2%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

492

18+/-5%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Patrick Nip

--

--

--

--

496

22+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Patrick Nip

--

--

--

--

496

7+/-2%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

496

15+/-5%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Innovation and Technology Nicholas Yang

588

20%

606

21%

530

28+/-4%

+7%[15]

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Innovation and Technology Nicholas Yang

588

25%

606

25%

530

19+/-4%

-6%[15]

Net approval rate

588

-5%

606

-5%

530

9+/-6%

+14%[15]

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Home Affairs Lau Kong-wah

591

24%

640

23%

508

29+/-4%

+6%[15]

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Home Affairs Lau Kong-wah

591

47%

640

48%

508

39+/-4%

-9%[15]

Net approval rate

591

-22%

640

-25%

508

-10+/-7%

+15%[15]

[13] Starting from 2006, these questions only uses sub-samples of the tracking surveys concerned, the sample size for each question also varies.

[14] All error figures in the table are calculated at 95% confidence level. “95% confidence level” means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Media can state “sampling error of percentages not more than +/-5% and sampling error of net approval rates not more than +/-7% at 95% confidence level” when quoting the above figures. The error margin of previous survey can be found at the POP Site.

[15] Such changes have gone beyond the sampling errors at the 95% confidence level, meaning that they are statistically significant prima facie. However, whether numerical differences are statistically significant or not is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful. (Postscript: Previous survey figures were not weighted by economic activity status, so comparisons were not made using “the same weighting method” as written in the original release, although the results are basically the same.)

[16] Based on the figures of latest survey, in one decimal place, the respective net approval rates of Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing and Secretary for Security John Lee are 27.8 and 27.6 percentage points. Thus, they are ranked fifth and sixth this time.


The latest survey showed that, CE Carrie Lam scored 63.7 marks, and 52% supported her as CE, her net approval rate is positive 19 percentage points. Meanwhile, the corresponding ratings of CS Matthew Cheung, FS Paul Chan and SJ Rimsky Yuen were 57.6, 40.5 and 52.8 marks, and 39%, 22% and 37% would vote for their reappointments correspondingly. Their net approval rates are positive 21, negative 19 and positive 14 percentage points respectively.

As for the Directors of Bureaux, according to the net approval rates, results revealed that the top position goes to Secretary for Labour and Welfare Law Chi-kwong, attaining positive 44 percentage points. The 2nd and 3rd places belong to Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Edward Yau and Secretary for Food and Health Sophia Chan with net approval rates of positive 41 and positive 38 percentage points respectively. Secretary for the Civil Service Joshua Law, Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing, Secretary for Security John Lee, Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung, Secretary for Development Michael Wong, Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury James Lau, Secretary for Transport and Housing Frank Chan, Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Patrick Nip, Secretary for Innovation and Technology Nicholas Yang and Secretary for Home Affairs Lau Kong-wah ranked 4th to 13th, their corresponding net approval rates are positive 35, positive 28, positive 28, positive 21, positive 20, positive 19, positive 18, positive 15, positive 9 and negative 10 percentage points. In other words, no Director scored a net approval rate of over 50%.

Opinion Daily

In January 2007, POP opened a feature page called “Opinion Daily” at the “POP Site”, to record significant events and selected polling figures on a day-to-day basis, in order to let readers judge by themselves the reasons for the ups and downs of different opinion figures. In July 2007, POP collaborated with Wisers Information Limited whereby Wisers supplies to POP each day starting from July 24, a record of significant events of that day, according to the research method designed by POP. These daily entries would be uploaded to “Opinion Daily” as soon as they are verified by POP.

For the polling items covered in this press release, the previous survey of some items was conducted from 5 to 8 June, 2017 while this survey was conducted from 3 to 6 July, 2017. During this period, herewith the significant events selected from counting newspaper headlines and commentaries on a daily basis and covered by at least 25% of the local newspaper articles. Readers can make their own judgment if these significant events have any impacts to different polling figures.

5/7/17

Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor attends the Legislative Council question-and-answer session.

1/7/17

Xi Jinping attends the Inaugural Ceremony of Fifth Term HKSAR Government.

29/6/17

Xi Jinping arrives in Hong Kong for handover anniversary.

23/6/17

The Executive Council passes the proposal of abolishing the MPF offsetting mechanism.

22/6/17

Chief Executive-elect Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor announces the Executive Council membership for the new-term Government.

20/6/17

Chief executive-elect Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor is interviewed by Xinhua News Agency.

17/6/17

The Civil Engineering and Development Department announces the concrete test results for Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge project.

13/6/17

The Chief Executive in Council has endorsed the report and recommendations of the Standard Working Hours Committee as a framework to guide the future formulation of the working hours policy.

Online Opinion Analysis

In July 2017, POP started collaborating with uMax Data Technology Limited to conduct “Online Opinion Analysis”. uMax Data would provide technical support concerning social big data to track posts in Facebook pages and various major forums in Hong Kong that mentioned specific political figures or organizations. When public opinion changes very significantly, POP will summarize the popular online posts about the specific political figures or organizations between the two surveys and compile a list of related events. Readers could make their own judgment if the events listed have impact on the related public opinion figures.

Since the latest survey findings reveal that the net approval rate of CE Carrie Lam has changed significantly compared to the figure recorded in the last survey, POP conducted “Online Opinion Analysis” to identify the top ten most discussed issues on the internet. The list of most discussed items after eliminating duplications is as follows:


Unveiling of Carrie Lam’s cabinet.

Carrie Lam points out that a sense of Chinese identity “I am Chinese” in children shall be created from kindergarten.

News reports mentions that the government has considered adjusting the land auction strategies by disclosing the top five highest tender prices.

Xi Jinping administers Carrie Lam and principal officials’ oath-taking.

Carrie Lam considers reopening the Civic Square.

Carrie Lam considers delinking the pricing of homes to be purchased by “Hong Kong first time home buyers” from the property market.


The results show that online public opinion had been discussing the new cabinets of Carrie Lam, education and land related new policies as well as the measures of reopening the Civic Square. Whether or not these items could sufficiently explain the changes in CE popularity ratings, readers could form their own judgment.

Commentary

Note: The following commentary was written by Senior Data Analyst of POP, Edward Tai.

Our latest survey conducted after the new cabinet of Carrie Lam has taken office shows that the popularity rating of CE Carrie Lam has increased dramatically by 11.5 marks to 63.7 as compared to two weeks ago. Her latest approval rate is 52%, disapproval rate 34%, giving a net popularity of positive 19 percentage points, which has also gone up dramatically by 15 percentage point as compared to two weeks ago. Both her popularity rating and net approval rate are at record high since she was elected.

As for the Secretaries of Departments, the latest support rating of CS Matthew Cheung is 57.6 marks. His approval rate is 39%, disapproval rate 18%, giving a net popularity of positive 21 percentage points. The latest support rating of FS Paul Chan is 40.5 marks, approval rate 22%, disapproval rate 41%, thus a net popularity of negative 19 percentage points. As for SJ Rimsky Yuen, his support rating is 52.8 marks, approval rate 37%, disapproval rate 23%, giving a net popularity of positive 14 percentage points. In terms of popularity rating and approval rate, Matthew Cheung continues to be the most popular Secretary of Department.

As for the Directors of Bureaux, only 3 of the 13 are re-appointed Directors, compared to one month ago, the net approval rates of Secretary for Home Affairs Lau Kong-wah, Secretary for Innovation and Technology Nicholas Yang and Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing have all gone up substantively, by 15, 14 and 8 percentage points respectively. Among all the Directors, only Lau Kong-wah registers negative popularity, at negative 10 percentage points. Law Chi-kwong is currently the most popular Director, with a net approval rate of positive 44 percentage points.

According to POP’s standard, no one falls under the category of “ideal” performer, Carrie Lam and Law Chi-kwong fall under the category of “successful” performer. The performance of Edward Yau, Wong Kam-sing, Joshua Law, Matthew Cheung, Rimsky Yuen, Lau Kong-wah and Paul Chan can be labeled as “mediocre”. That of Sophia Chan, John Lee, Kevin Yeung, Nicholas Yang, Michael Wong, Frank Chan, James Lau and Patrick Nip can be labeled as “inconspicuous”. No one falls into the category of “depressing” or “disastrous”.


The following table summarizes the grading of CE Carrie Lam and the principal officials for readers’ easy reference:

“Ideal”: those with approval rates of over 66%; ranked by their approval rates shown inside brackets

“Successful”: those with approval rates of over 50%; ranked by their approval rates shown inside brackets

CE Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor (52%)[17]; Secretary for Labour and Welfare Law Chi-kwong (52%) [17]

“Mediocre”: those not belonging to other 5 types; ranked by their approval rates shown inside brackets

Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Edward Yau Tang-wah (48%); Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing (45%); Secretary for the Civil Service Joshua Law Chi-kong (43%); CS Matthew Cheung Kin-chung (39%); SJ Rimsky Yuen Kwok-keung (37%); Secretary for Home Affairs Lau Kong-wah (29%); FS Paul Chan Mo-po (22%)

“Inconspicuous”: those with recognition rates of less than 50%; ranked by their approval rates; the first figure inside bracket is approval rate while the second figure is recognition rate

Secretary for Food and Health Sophia Chan Siu-chee (42%, 45%); Secretary for Security John Lee Ka-chiu (34%, 41%); Secretary for Education Kevin Yeung Yun-hung (30%, 39%); Secretary for Innovation and Technology Nicholas Yang Wei-hsiung (28%, 48%) [18]; Secretary for Development Michael Wong Wai-lun (28%, 36%)[18]; Secretary for Transport and Housing Frank Chan Fan (25%, 31%); Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury James Henry Lau Jr (24%, 30%); Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Patrick Nip Tak-kuen (22%, 29%)

“Depressing”: those with disapproval rates of over 50%; ranked by their disapproval rates shown inside brackets

“Disastrous”: those with disapproval rates of over 66%; ranked by their disapproval rates shown inside brackets

[17] In one decimal place, the respective approval rates of CE Carrie Lam and Secretary for Labour and Welfare Law Chi-kwong are 52.3% and 51.7%.

[18] In one decimal place, the respective approval rates of Secretary for Innovation and Technology Nicholas Yang Wei-hsiung and Secretary for Development Michael Wong Wai-lun are 28.3% and 27.7%.


Future Release (Tentative)

  • July 18, 2017 (Tuesday) 1pm to 2pm: Ratings of Top 10 Legislative Councillors

  • Reference – Technical Notes of “Online Opinion Analysis”

    Technically, POP research team firstly determines and inputs related keywords to be searched on the platform provided by uMax Data. POP then selects targeted online platforms to be monitored (currently selected: Facebook and forums), and extract the top five most discussed items on each online platform, thus come up with a list of 10 items in total. By eliminating duplications in the top ten items, POP compiles a table which is included in the press release for readers’ reference.