HKU POP SITE releases popularity figures of CE Donald Tsang, Secretaries of Departments and Directors of Bureauxunder the accountability systemBack

 
Press Release on December 9, 2008

| Abstract | Latest Figures | Opinion Daily | Commentary | News about POP |
| About HKUPOP | Detailed Findings (Popularity of Chief Executive/Popularity of Principal Officials) |


Abstract

The Public Opinion Programme (POP) at the University of Hong Kong interviewed 1,004 Hong Kong people between 2 and 8 December by means of a random telephone survey conducted by real interviewers. The survey finds that after recovering some grounds last month, the popularity figures of CE Donald Tsang drop again, his support rating now stands at 50.2 marks, with approval rate 2 percentage-points below disapproval rate. In terms of support rating, Tsang's figure is now at record low since we started polling his popularity in April 1997. For the Secretaries of Departments, the support ratings of CS Henry Tang and FS John Tsang are both at record low since they took up their current posts, quite like the CE. The popularity figures of SJ Wong Yan-lung, however, have remained high, unaffected by the recent mishaps. As for the Directors of Bureaux, compared to one month ago, the approval rate of Secretary for Security Ambrose Lee plunges 20 percentage points. He has dropped out of the 'successful' list, but is still the most popular Director of Bureau. Other Directors of Bureaux whose approval rates have registered changes beyond sampling errors include Secretary for Food and Health York Chow, whose approval rate goes up by 8 percentage points, Secretary for Transport and Housing Eva Cheng, whose approval rate drops 6 percentage points, and Secretary for Development Carrie Lam, whose approval rate goes up by 5 percentage points. According to the benchmarks set by us quite some time ago, no official now falls under the categories of 'ideal' performance. Wong Yan-lung can be labeled as 'successful', Ambrose Lee, Carrie Lam, Matthew Cheung, Donald Tsang, Henry Tang, York Chow, John Tsang, Michael Suen and Stephen Lam can be labeled as 'mediocre', and Denise Yue, Edward Yau, Eva Cheng, Tsang Tak-sing, Ceajer Chan and Rita Lau can be labeled as 'inconspicuous'. Director of POP Robert Chung observes, the popularity plunge of the CE and the Secretary for Security is no doubt due to the Thailand charter flights incident. The fact that CE's popularity rating is just marginally above 50 marks is a dangerous signal. The sampling error of all approval and disapproval rates is between +/-1 and 4 percentage points at 95% confidence level, while the sampling error of rating figures needs another calculation. The response rate of the survey is 68%.

Points to note:

* The address of the "HKU POP SITE" is http://hkupop.hku.hk, journalists can check out the details of the survey there.
* The sample size of this survey is 1,004 successful interviews, not 1,004 x 67.6% response rate. In the past, many media made this mistake.
* The maximum sampling error of all approval and disapproval rates is below +/-1 to 4 percentage points at 95% confidence level, while the sampling error of rating figures needs another calculation. "95% confidence level" means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. When quoting these figures, journalists can state "sampling error of various ratings not more than +/-1.4 and sampling error of percentages not more than +/-4% at 95% confidence level".
* When quoting percentages of this survey, journalists should refrain from reporting decimal places, but when quoting the rating figures, one decimal place can be used, in order to match the precision level of the figures.
* The data of this survey is collected by means of random telephone interviews conducted by real interviewers, not by any interactive voice system (IVS). If a research organization uses "computerized random telephone survey" to camouflage its IVS operation, it should be considered unprofessional.


Latest Figures

POP today releases on schedule via the POP Site the latest figures of CE Donald Tsang, Secretaries of Departments and Directors of Bureaux under the accountability system. All the figures have been weighted according to provisional figures obtained from the Census and Statistics Department regarding the gender-age distribution of the Hong Kong population in mid-2008. Herewith the contact information for the latest survey:

Date of survey

Overall sample size

Response rate

Maximum sampling error of percentages*

2-8/12/2008

1,004

67.6%

+/-3%

* Calculated at 95% confidence level using full sample size. "95% confidence level" means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Questions using only sub-samples would have bigger sampling error. Sampling errors of ratings are calculated according to the distribution of the scores collected.

As different questions involve different sub-samples, the sample errors will vary accordingly. The table below briefly shows the relationship between sample size and maximum sampling errors for the readers to capture the corresponding changes:

Sample size
(total sample or sub-sample)

Sampling error of percentages*
(maximum values)

Sample size
(total sample or sub-sample)

Sampling error of percentages*
(maximum values)

1,300

+/- 2.8 %

1,350

+/- 2.7 %

1,200

+/- 2.9 %

1,250

+/- 2.8 %

1,100

+/- 3.0 %

1,150

+/- 3.0 %

1,000

+/- 3.2 %

1,050

+/- 3.1 %

900

+/- 3.3 %

950

+/- 3.2 %

800

+/- 3.5 %

850

+/- 3.4 %

700

+/- 3.8 %

750

+/- 3.7 %

600

+/- 4.1 %

650

+/- 3.9 %

500

+/- 4.5 %

550

+/- 4.3 %

400

+/- 5.0 %

450

+/- 4.7 %

* Based on 95% confidence interval.

"Maximum sampling errors" occur when survey figures are close to 50%. If the figures are close to 0% or 100%, the sampling error will diminish accordingly. The sampling errors of ratings, however, will depend on the distribution of the raw figures. Since January 2007, POP lists out the sampling errors of all survey figures in detail and explain them in due course. Recent popularity figures of Donald Tsang are summarized as follows:

Date of survey

15/10/08^

22-24/10/08

5-7/11/08

18-24/11/08

2-8/12/08*

Latest Change

Sample base

1,011

1,018

1,003

1,006

1,004

--

Overall response rate

74.9%

70.5%

67.9%

71.3%

67.6%

--

Rating of CE Donald Tsang

53.9

51.5

53.4

54.5

50.2 +/-1.4

-4.3#

Vote of confidence in CE Donald Tsang

44%

39%

45%

46%

41% +/-3%

-5%#

Vote of no confidence in CE Donald Tsang

34%

39%

38%

34%

43% +/-3%

+9%#

* "95% confidence level" means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Media can state "sampling error of various ratings not more than +/-1.4, sampling error of percentages not more than +/-3% at 95% confidence level" when quoting the above figures. The error margin of previous survey can be found at the POP Site.
^ These questions only use sub-samples of the survey concerned. The sub-sample sizes of questions on CE's support rating and hypothetical voting were 687 and 671 respectively.
# Such changes have gone beyond the sampling errors at the 95% confidence level, meaning that they are statistically significant prima facie. However, whether numerical differences are statistically significant or not is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful.


Figures on the latest popularity ratings of the three Secretaries of Departments under the accountability system are summarized below:

Date of survey

1-4/8/08

1-5/9/08

8-10/10/08

5-7/11/08

2-8/12/08

Latest change*

Sample base

1,009

1,010

1,007

1,003

1,004

--

Overall response rate

69.0%

68.7%

61.9%

67.9%

67.6%

--

Ratings of CS Henry Tang

59.1

55.1

55.5

56.2

53.0 +/-1.3

-3.2#

Vote of confidence in CS Henry Tang

51%

49%

44%

44%

40% +/-3%

-4%#

Vote of no confidence in CS Henry Tang

10%

13%

13%

12%

18% +/-2%

+6%#

Ratings of FS John Tsang

57.6

53.5

52.2

51.0

50.8 +/-1.3

-0.2

Vote of confidence in FS John Tsang

47%

43%

41%

36%

37% +/-3%

+1%

Vote of no confidence in FS John Tsang

13%

16%

17%

22%

21% +/-3%

-1%

Ratings of SJ Y.L. Wong

60.7

59.1

58.9

59.4

59.4 +/-1.2

--

Vote of confidence in SJ Y.L.Wong

58%

56%

60%

58%

59% +/-3%

+1%

Vote of no confidence in SJ Y.L.Wong

6%

6%

7%

5%

4% +/-1%

-1%

* The frequency of this series of questions is different for different questions, and also different from that of CE popularity ratings. Comparisons, if made, should be synchronized using the same intervals.
** "95% confidence level" means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified.
# Such changes have gone beyond the sampling errors at the 95% confidence level, meaning that they are statistically significant prima facie. However, whether numerical differences are statistically significant or not is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful.


Figures on the latest popularity ratings of Directors of Bureaux under the accountability system are summarized below:

Date of survey

8-10/10/08

5-7/11/08

2-8/12/08

Latest Change (%)

Total sample size

1,007*

1,003*

1,004*

--

Overall response rate

61.9%

67.9%

67.6%

--

Sample base for each question/ Percentage of answer

Base

%

Base

%

Base

%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Security Ambrose Lee

595

65%

578

69%

561

49% +/-4%

-20%#

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Security Ambrose Lee

595

5%

578

4%

561

20% +/-3%

+16%#

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Development Carrie Lam^

584

46%

551

42%

523

47% +/-4%

+5%#

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Development Carrie Lam

584

14%

551

16%

523

11% +/-3%

-5%#

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Labour and Welfare Matthew Cheung^

617

50%

647

47%

541

47% +/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Labour and Welfare Matthew Cheung

617

12%

647

16%

541

9% +/-2%

-7%#

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Food and Health York Chow

574

31%

611

29%

609

37% +/-4%

+8%#

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Food and Health York Chow

574

42%

611

39%

609

34% +/-4%

-5%#

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Education Michael Suen

550

38%

565

35%

642

36% +/-4%

+1%

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Education Michael Suen

550

28%

565

33%

642

29% +/-4%

-4%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for the Civil Service Denise Yue

615

28%

546

26%

595

30% +/-4%

+4%

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for the Civil Service Denise Yue

615

14%

546

15%

595

12% +/-3%

-3%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for the Environment Edward Yau

599

31%

574

30%

551

29% +/-4%

-1%

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for the Environment Edward Yau

599

14%

574

14%

551

12% +/-3%

-2%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Transport and Housing Eva Cheng

532

31%

539

34%

605

28% +/-4%

-6%#

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Transport and Housing Eva Cheng

532

12%

539

10%

605

15% +/-3%

+5%#

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Stephen Lam

594

23%

578

26%

633

25% +/-3%

-1%

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Stephen Lam

594

32%

578

31%

633

32% +/-4%

+1%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Home Affairs Tsang Tak-sing

567

28%

592

25%

535

24% +/-4%

-1%

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Home Affairs Tsang Tak-sing

567

29%

592

25%

535

24% +/-4%

-1%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury Ceajer Chan

578

33%

543

25%

536

23% +/-4%

-2%

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury Ceajer Chan

578

17%

543

17%

536

17% +/-3%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Rita Lau

579

23%

552

19%

613

20% +/-3%

+1%

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Rita Lau

579

9%

552

15%

613

17% +/-3%

+2%

* Starting from 2006, these questions only uses sub-samples of the tracking surveys concerned, the sample size for each question also varies.
** "95% confidence level" means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified.
# Such changes have gone beyond the sampling errors at the 95% confidence level, meaning that they are statistically significant prima facie. However, whether numerical differences are statistically significant or not is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful.
^ The approval rates of Secretary for Development Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor and Secretary for Labour and Welfare Matthew Cheung Kin-chung are 47.00% and 46.96% respectively in 2 decimal places.


The latest survey showed that, CE Donald Tsang scored 50.2 marks, and 41% supported him as the Chief Executive. Meanwhile, the corresponding ratings of CS Henry Tang Ying-yen, FS John Tsang Chun-wah and SJ Wong Yan-lung were 53.0, 50.8 and 59.4 marks, and 40%, 37% and 59% would vote for their reappointment correspondingly. As for the Directors of Bureaux, results revealed that the top three approval rates fell to Secretary for Security Ambrose Lee Siu-kwong, Secretary for Development Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor and Secretary for Labour and Welfare Matthew Cheung Kin-chung with respective support rates of 49%, 47% and 47%. The 4th to 6th ranks went to Secretary for Food and Health York Chow Yat-ngok, Secretary for Education Michael Suen Ming-yeung and Secretary for the Civil Service Denise Yue Chung-yee, with respective support rates of 37%, 36% and 30%. The 7th to 11th ranks went to Secretary for Environment Edward Yau Tang-wah, Secretary for Transport and Housing Eva Cheng Yu-wah, Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Stephen Lam Sui-lung, Secretary for Home Affairs Tsang Tak-sing and Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury Ceajer Chan Ka-keung and gained 29%, 28%, 25%, 24% and 23% vote of confidence from the public respectively. The 12th rank went to Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Rita Lau Ng Wai-lan, achieving 20% of public support. In other words, no Directors of Bureaux can score approval rates of over 50%.

Opinion Daily

In January 2007, POP opened a feature page called "Opinion Daily" at the "POP Site", to record significant events and selected polling figures on a day-to-day basis. Our purpose is to provide readers with accurate information so that they can judge by themselves the reasons for the ups and downs of different opinion figures. When "Opinion Daily" began to operate on January 17, 2007, it only contained significant events and popularity figures of the Chief Executive over the past few months. As of today, it contains a chronology of events and many poll figures registered since January 1, 2006. Readers can now check on the results of 9 different polling items compiled by POP, including the popularity of the Chief Executive, the HKSAR government, and the Secretaries of Departments under the accountability system. In near future, the content of "Opinion Daily" will continue to expand, in order to promote the science of opinion polling.

In July 2007, POP collaborated with Wisers Information Limited whereby Wisers supplies to POP since July 24 each day a record of significant events of that day, according to the research method designed by POP. These daily entries would be uploaded to the "Opinion Daily" feature page as soon as they are verified by POP, in order to provide readers with swifter and more accurate information.

In August 2007, POP began to include in its regular press releases a list of significant events which happened in between two surveys, so that readers can make their own judgment on whether these events have any effect on the ups and downs of the polling figures. This press release is no exception.

For the polling items covered in this press release, using the previous survey as a reference point for comparison, our "Opinion Daily" for this release starts on August 11, 2007, because the previous survey of some items was conducted from November 5 to 7, 2008 while this survey was conducted from 2-8/12/2008. During this period, herewith the significant events selected from counting newspaper headlines and commentaries on a daily basis and covered by at least 25% of the local newspaper articles. Readers can make their own judgment if these significant events have any impacts to different polling figures.

3/12/08

Taxi strike against new fare structure blocks highway.

2/12/08

Newspapers report and discuss the issue of Hong Kong people stranded in Thailand.

1/12/08

The government arranges charter flights to pick up residents in Thailand.

29/11/08

2,000 restaurants are to introduce "$1-meal" next month.

19/11/08

Hopewell Holdings cut down the size of its long-proposed Wan Chai Mega Tower.

18/11/08

The latest HK unemployment rate rises to 3.5%.

17/11/08

HSBC announces it will slash 450 jobs in Hong Kong.

14/11/08

HK economy shrinks for a second quarter as global crisis bites.

12/11/08

The Legislative Council will investigate the Lehman Brothers minibonds affair.

10/11/08

HKSAR Government announces a HK$10 billion loans special scheme for small and medium-sized enterprises.

8/11/08

ICAC principal investigator Alan Wu Tat-sun dies in motorcycle accident.

7/11/08

1) HSBC cuts its prime lending rate by a quarter percentage point.
2) DBS Group to cut 900 jobs.


Commentary

Note: The following commentary was written by Director of POP Robert Chung.

Our latest survey shows that after recovering some grounds last month, the popularity figures of CE Donald Tsang drop again, no doubt due to the Thailand charter flights incident. CE Tsang's support rating now stands at 50.2 marks, with approval rate 2 percentage-points below disapproval rate. In terms of support rating, Tsang's figure is now at record low since we started polling his popularity in April 1997. The fact that it is just marginally above 50 marks is a dangerous signal.

For the Secretaries of Departments, the support ratings of CS Henry Tang and FS John Tsang are both at record low since they took up their current posts, quite like the CE. The popularity figures of SJ Wong Yan-lung, however, have remained high, unaffected by the recent mishaps.

As for the Directors of Bureaux, compared to one month ago, the approval rate of Secretary for Security Ambrose Lee plunges 20 percentage points, due to the impact of the charter flights incident. Lee has now dropped out of the 'successful' list, but he is still the most popular Director of Bureau. Other Directors of Bureaux whose approval rates have registered changes beyond sampling errors include Secretary for Food and Health York Chow, whose approval rate goes up by 8 percentage points, Secretary for Transport and Housing Eva Cheng, whose approval rate drops 6 percentage points, and Secretary for Development Carrie Lam, whose approval rate goes up by 5 percentage points.

According to the benchmarks set by us quite some time ago, no official now falls under the categories of 'ideal' performance. Wong Yan-lung can be labeled as 'successful', Ambrose Lee, Carrie Lam, Matthew Cheung, Donald Tsang, Henry Tang, York Chow, John Tsang, Michael Suen and Stephen Lam can be labeled as 'mediocre', and Denise Yue, Edward Yau, Eva Cheng, Tsang Tak-sing, Ceajer Chan and Rita Lau can be labeled as 'inconspicuous'. No official falls under the categories of 'depressing' or 'disastrous'. As for the reasons affecting the popularity change of these officials, other than the Thailand charter flights incident, readers can make their own judgment using detailed records shown in our 'Opinion Daily' feature page.

The following table summarizes the grading of the principal officials for readers' easy reference:

"Ideal": those with approval rates of over 66%; ranked by their approval rates shown inside brackets

None

 

"Successful": those with approval rates of over 50%; ranked by their approval rates shown inside brackets

SJ Wong Yan-lung (59%)

 

"Mediocre": those not belonging to other 5 types; ranked by their approval rates shown inside brackets

Secretary for Security Ambrose Lee Siu-kwong (49%); Secretary for Development Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor (47%*); Secretary for Labour and Welfare Matthew Cheung Kin-chung (47%*); CE Donald Tsang Yam-kuen (41%); CS Henry Tang Ying-yen (40%); Secretary for Food and Health York Chow Yat-ngok (37%*); FS John Tsang Chun-wah (37%*); Secretary for Education Michael Suen Ming-yeung (36%); Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Stephen Lam Sui-lung (25%)

 

"Inconspicuous": those with recognition rates of less than 50%; ranked by their approval rates; the first figure inside bracket is approval rate while the second figure is recognition rate

Secretary for the Civil Service Denise Yue Chung-yee (30%, 42%); Secretary for the Environment Edward Yau Tang-wah (29%, 41%); Secretary for Transport and Housing Eva Cheng Yu-wah (28%, 43%); Secretary for Home Affairs Tsang Tak-sing (24%, 48%); Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury Ceajer Chan Ka-keung (23%, 39%); Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Rita Lau Ng Wai-lan (20%, 37%)

 

"Depressing": those with disapproval rates of over 50%; ranked by their disapproval rates

None

 

"Disastrous": those with disapproval rates of over 66%; ranked by their disapproval rates

None

* The approval rates of Secretary for Development Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor and Secretary for Labour and Welfare Matthew Cheung Kin-chung are 47.00% and 46.96% respectively in 2 decimal places. The approval rates of Secretary for Food and Health York Chow Yat-ngok and FS John Tsang Chun-wah are 37.2% and 37.1% respectively in 1 decimal place.

A new grading system was adopted last year for the HKCEE Chinese Language and English Language, whereby the old 'pulling curve' system using a six-grade norm reference approach was replaced by a standard-referenced approach with six grades from Level '1' to '5*'. This should have deepened people's understanding of the standard-referenced approach, which is fairly similar to POP's grading system of principal officials. We therefore would not object to community members using Level '1' to '5*' to describe the popularity of principle officials.

News about POP

POP's normal practice is to release the results of our regular surveys every Tuesday afternoon via our POP Site, except during public holidays, each time with a forecast of the items to be released in the next 7 days. According to schedule, our next release of regular survey findings will be December16, 2008, Tuesday, between 1pm and 2 pm, when the latest findings of people's ethnic identity will be released.

POP will also follow the rhythm of the WorldPublicOpinion.org (WPO) to globally release the Chinese versions of WPO's press releases regularly, via our "World Public Opinion Platform" accessible through our POP Site and the "Hong Kong People's Opinion Platform" at http://www.hkpop.hk. POP will release tomorrow, December 10, WPO's next round of international polling results on the Universal Declaration on Human Rights.

Our general practice is to answer all questions on the research design of the surveys published in the POP Site as soon as we receive them, but we will not further comment on the findings. We welcome questions for follow-up purpose, please email them to us at <[email protected]>. We will keep such an arrangement under constant review, suggestions most welcome. Please note that everything carried in the POP Site does not represent the stand of the University of Hong Kong. Dr Robert Ting-Yiu Chung, Director of POP, is responsible for everything posted herewith, except for column articles which represent the stand of their authors.

For the whole of last year, we have included in our regular press releases a small educational section for the purpose of sharing our research experience with the readers and the general public, and the subject of our education section today is "About HKUPOP". In the near future, we will keep on stepping up our effort in promoting general civic education to enhance our POP Site accordingly.

About HKUPOP

Popularity surveys of CE and principal officials

In advanced democratic countries, the popularity of top leaders and principal officials is the crux of all opinion polls. Shortly after HKUPOP was established, we started to conduct surveys on these aspects. We have explained the development of these surveys 19 times in our press releases issued between October 31, 2006 and November 11, 2008. Today, we post it again, so that readers can review such development.

(1) Development of CE's popularity survey

  • From its establishment to the handover of Hong Kong, POP has continually conducted surveys to measure the popularity rating of Governor Chris Patten. After the handover when Tung Chee-hwa became the first Chief Executive in 1997, we began our popularity survey of CE Tung Chee-hwa. After Tung resigned and Donald Tsang succeeded, POP has begun to measure Tsang's popularity. The frequency of our surveys was at least once every month during the Patten era. It was then increased to three times per month when Tung became CE, until the end of 1997. From January 1998 onwards, it was reduced to twice every month.


  • The question wordings used in "popularity of Governor or CE" survey are: "Please use a scale of 0-100 to rate your extent of support to the Governor/ the Chief Executive XXX, with 0 indicating absolutely not supportive, 100 indicating absolutely supportive and 50 indicating half-half. How would you rate the Governor/the Chief Executive XXX?" and "If a general election of the Chief Executive were to be held tomorrow, and you had the right to vote, would you vote for XXX?".


  • Before April 2000, the sample size of our regular surveys was set at slightly over 500. After that, it was increased to at least 1,000.


(2) Development of CE's popularity (performance) survey
  • The frequency of our surveys was once every two months since August 2002. From February 2004 onwards, it was reduced to once every six months.


  • The question wordings used in "CE popularity (performance)" survey are: "Do you think XXX is doing a good or bad job as CE?".


  • Regarding the sample size, ever since the beginning, the sample size of surveys has been set at slightly over 1,000.


(3) Development of the survey for Secretaries of Departments:
  • For the rating survey of the Secretaries of Departments, in between January to November 2001, the frequency of the survey was conducted on an irregular basis. From January 2002 onwards, the survey is conducted once every month. For the support rates of the Secretaries based on people's hypothetical vote of confidence, it was surveyed once every three months from September 2002 to December 2003. Then it was changed to once every two months from February 2004 to December 2005. From January 2006 onwards, the survey is conducted once every month.


  • The wordings used in the questionnaire are: "Please use a scale of 0-100 to rate your extent of support to Chief Secretary for Administration XXX/Financial Secretary YYY/Secretary for Justice ZZZ, with 0 indicating absolutely not supportive, 100 indicating supportive and 50 indicating half-half. How would you rate XXX/YYY/ZZZ?". For the support rates of Secretaries, the wordings are "If you had the right to vote on the reappointment or dismissal of XXX/YYY/ZZZ as the Chief Secretary for Administration/Financial Secretary/Secretary for Justice tomorrow, how would you vote?"


  • Regarding the sample size, ever since the beginning, the sample size of surveys has been set at slightly over 1,000.


(4) Development of the survey for Directors of Bureaux:
  • For the rating survey of the Directors of Bureaux, in between June 2002 to December 2005, the frequency was once every month. From January 2006 to June 2007, the survey is conducted once every two months. For the support rates of Directors of Bureaux, the frequency was once every three months from September 2002 to December 2003. Then from February 2004 to June 2007, the survey was conducted once every two months. In July 2007, with the beginning of CE's new term of office and the appointment of new principal officials, the frequency of support rate survey of the Directors of Bureaux was increased to once every month, while the frequency of rating survey was reduced to once every three months. Moreover, although all survey results are uploaded onto the POP Site in detail, POP no longer analyze the result of rating surveys. This is to better match the evolvement of the accountability system as well as the pace of democratic development.


  • Similar to the popularity survey of the Secretaries of Departments, that of the Directors of Bureaux also includes the questions of rating and hypothetical voting. The wordings used in the questionnaire are: "Please use a scale of 0-100 to rate your extent of support to XXX, with 0 indicating absolutely not supportive, 100 indicating supportive and 50 indicating half-half. How would you rate XXX?" and "If you had the right to vote on the reappointment or dismissal of XXX as YYYYYYYYY tomorrow, how would you vote?" However, the two questions are may not be asked in different the same surveys separately.


  • Regarding the sample size, from the beginning to December 2005, the sample size of the surveys was set at slightly over 1,000. However, from 2006 onwards, this series of questions only uses sub-samples of the tracking surveys concerned, and the sample size for each question also varies.


All the findings from our surveys on "popularity of principal officials" have been released online through our HKU POP Site.


| Abstract | Latest Figures | Opinion Daily | Commentary | News about POP |
| About HKUPOP | Detailed Findings (Popularity of Chief Executive/Popularity of Principal Officials) |