HKU POP releases Legislative Council election survey,popularity of officials, and PSI figuresBack


Press Release on August 14, 2012

| Special Announcements | Abstract | Latest Figures |Commentary | Future Release (Tentative) |
| Detailed Findings (Popularity of Chief Executive/Popularity of Principal Officials/2012 Legislative Council Election Feature Page) |


Special Announcements

(1) The Public Opinion Programme (POP) at the University of Hong Kong issued an erratum to revise CE Leung’s rating in early July from 54.0 to 53.8 marks. This does not affect his rating in mid-late July at all, and the picture remains that CE’s popularity goes up and then down in July. All media please take note.

 

(2) The “Super DC Election Guessing Game” hosted by the “PopCon” e-platform (http://popcon.hk) of POP has already been launched, users can now make guesses on the result of the Super DC election due to take place on September 9, until 00:00AM on the election day.


 

Abstract

POP interviewed 1,002 Hong Kong people and close to 2,000 registered voters in between August 1 to 8, 2012 by means of random telephone surveys separately conducted by real interviewers. The survey shows that after the nomination period for this year’s Legislative Council election is over, 75% of all registered voters managed to tell us the exact month of the election, namely, September. This is much better than four years ago. However, only one-third are aware that they could also vote in the District Council (second) Functional Constituency, so-called “Super DC”, 56% are uncertain, reflecting a low awareness of the election. As for split-voting, only 15% of the voters said they are willing to adopt strategic voting, which is much lower than that registered four years ago. Regarding the popularity of officials, our latest survey shows that the popularity of CE Leung has not changed much compared to two weeks ago, but has significantly dropped compared to one month ago. His net popularity now stands at negative 8 percentage points. As for the Secretaries of Departments, compared to a month ago, the popularity of CS Carrie Lam has slightly dropped, with a net popularity of positive 48 percentage points. She is still the most popular Secretary of Department. The popularity of FS John Tsang has significantly increased, with a net approval rate of positive 41 percentage points. As for SJ Rimsky Yuen, his popularity has not changed much, with a net popularity of positive 15 percentage points. As for the Directors of Bureaux, excluding the newly appointed Secretary for Development Paul Chan, compared to one month ago, the net approval rate of 3 of the 11 Directors have gone up while 8 have gone down. Among them, Secretary for Education Eddie Ng, Secretary for Environment Wong Kam-sing, Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Gregory So and Secretary for Security Lai Tung-kwok have registered changes in net approval rates beyond sampling error, down by 41, 15, 10 and 10 percentage points respectively. Among all the Directors, only Secretary for Development Paul Chan and Secretary for Education Eddie Ng register negative popularity, at negative 25 and 28 percentage points respectively. Secretary for Food and Health Ko Wing-man continues to be the most popular Director. According to POP’s standard, Ko Wing-man falls under the category of “ideal” performer, Matthew Cheung, Carrie Lam and John Tsang now fall under the category of “successful” performer. The performance of Lai Tung-kwok, Ceajer Chan, Anthony Cheung, CY Leung, Tsang Tak-sing, Eddie Ng and Paul Chan can be labeled as “mediocre”, that of Raymond Tam, Wong Kam-sing, Gregory So, Paul Tang and Rimsky Yuen can be labeled as “inconspicuous”. No one falls into the category of “depressing” nor “disastrous”. The maximum sampling error of all approval and disapproval rates is +/-4 percentage points at 95% confidence level, while the sampling error of rating figures and net approval rates needs another calculation. The response rate of the popularity survey of officials is 66%.

Points to note:
[1] The address of the "HKU POP SITE" is http://hkupop.hku.hk, journalists can check out the details of the survey there.
[2] The sample size of LC election survey is 2,180 successful interviews, not 2,180 x 69.0% response rate. The sample size of popularity survey of officials is 1,002 successful interviews, not 1,002 x 65.9% response rate. In the past, many media made this mistake.
[3] The maximum sampling error of all percentages of each survey is +/-4 percentage points at 95% confidence level, while the sampling error of rating figures and net approval rates needs another calculation. "95% confidence level" means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. When quoting these figures, journalists can state "sampling error of various ratings not more than +/-2.0, sampling error of percentages not more than +/-4% and sampling error of net approval rates not more than +/-7% at 95% confidence level".
[4] When quoting percentages of this survey, journalists should refrain from reporting decimal places, but when quoting the rating figures, one decimal place can be used, in order to match the precision level of the figures.
[5] The data of this survey is collected by means of random telephone interviews conducted by real interviewers, not by any interactive voice system (IVS). If a research organization uses "computerized random telephone survey" to camouflage its IVS operation, it should be considered unprofessional.



Latest Figures

Legislative Council Election

 

Whenever there are large-scale elections, POP would conduct different surveys to track opinion changes. POP recently conducted a pre-election survey with the following contact information. All figures have been weighted according to the distribution of age, gender and geographic constituency of registered voters in the 2012 electoral roll provided by the Registration and Electoral Office.

Date of survey

Overall sample size
(registered voters)

Effective response rate

Maximum sampling error of percentages[6]

1-8/8/2012

2,180

69.0%

+/-2%

[6] Errors are calculated at 95% confidence level using full sample size. “95% confidence level” means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified.

 

Major findings are summarized below, together with parallel figures obtained in the last Legislative Council elections of 2004 and 2008:

Date of survey

18-22/8/04

1-3/8/08

1-8/8/12

Latest change

Sub-sample base (registered voters)

1,882

771

1,266

--

Effective response rate

65.4%

65.7%

69.0%

--

Maximum sampling error of rating (at 95% confidence level)

+/-2%

+/-4%

+/-3%

--

Latest finding

Finding

Finding

Finding & error [7]

--

Could tell the exact date or month of the election

--

69%

75+/-2%

+6%[8]

Inclined to follow instructions to the electorates on the allocation of votes to another list belonging to the same camp

19%

20%

15+/-2%

-5%[8]

Inclined not to follow instructions to the electorates on the allocation of votes to another list belonging to the same camp

56%

64%

72+/-3%

+8%[8]

 

Date of survey

1-8/8/12

Sub-sample base (registered voters)

1,918

Effective response rate

69.0%

Maximum sampling error of rating (at 95% confidence level)

+/-2%

Latest finding

Finding & error [7]

Well understood he/she is registered voter of “Super DC election”

34+/-2%

Well understood he/she is NOT registered voter of “Super DC election”

10+/-1%

Uncertain of the registered voter’s status

56+/-2%

Total

100%

[7] All error figures in the table are calculated at 95% confidence level. "95% confidence level" means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Media can state “sampling error of percentages not more than +/-3% at 95% confidence level” when quoting the above figures.
[8] Such changes have gone beyond the sampling errors at the 95% confidence level, meaning that they are statistically significant prima facie. However, whether numerical differences are statistically significant or not is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful.

 

One month before this year's election, 75% of the registered voters responded were aware of the coming Legislative Council election in September. With respect to whether they would follow split-vote instructions for strategic voting, 15% inclined to do so, which means a decrease of 5 percentage-points compared to the same time in 2008. On the other hand, 72% inclined not to do so, which means an increase of 8 percentage-points compared to the same time in 2008. As regards the new election of District Council (second) Functional Constituency (also known as “Super DC”), 34% of the respondents admitted that they are registered voters of this FC, 10% clearly understood that they are not, while 56% remained uncertain.

 

II. Popularity figures of CE CY Leung and principal officials

 

POP today releases the latest popularity figures of CE CY Leung and various Secretaries of Departments and Directors of Bureaux under the accountability system. All the figures have been weighted according to provisional figures obtained from the Census and Statistics Department regarding the gender-age distribution of the Hong Kong population in 2011 year-end. Herewith the contact information for the latest survey:

Date of survey

Overall sample size

Response rate

Maximum sampling error of percentages[9]

2-8/8/2012

1,002

65.9%

+/-3%

[9] Errors are calculated at 95% confidence level using full sample size. “95% confidence level” means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Questions using only sub-samples would have bigger sampling error. Sampling errors of ratings and net approval rates are calculated according to the distribution of the scores collected.

 

As different questions involve different sub-samples, the sampling errors will vary accordingly. The table below briefly shows the relationship between sample size and maximum sampling errors for the readers to capture the corresponding changes:                    

Sample size
(total sample or sub-sample)

Sampling error of percentages[10]
(maximum values)

Sample size
(total sample or sub-sample)

Sampling error of percentages[10]
(maximum values)

1,300

+/- 2.8 %

1,350

+/- 2.7 %

1,200

+/- 2.9 %

1,250

+/- 2.8 %

1,100

+/- 3.0 %

1,150

+/- 3.0 %

1,000

+/- 3.2 %

1,050

+/- 3.1 %

900

+/- 3.3 %

950

+/- 3.2 %

800

+/- 3.5 %

850

+/- 3.4 %

700

+/- 3.8 %

750

+/- 3.7 %

600

+/- 4.1 %

650

+/- 3.9 %

500

+/- 4.5 %

550

+/- 4.3 %

400

+/- 5.0 %

450

+/- 4.7 %

[10] Based on 95% confidence interval.

 

Recent popularity figures of CE CY Leung are summarized as follows:


Date of survey

18-24/5/12

30/5-6/6/12

19-25/6/12

9-11/7/12

17-20/7/12

2-8/8/12

Latest change

Sample base

1,001

1,041

1,048

1,000

1,018

1,002

--

Overall response rate

66.8%

63.7%

69.6%

69.1%

65.8%

65.9%

--

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding and error[11]

--

Rating of CE CY Leung

54.3[12]

54.1

51.3[12]

53.8[12]

51.2[12]

51.6+/-1.5

+0.4

Vote of confidence in CE CY Leung

46%[12]

49%

47%

45%

41%[12]

39+/-3%

-2%

Vote of no confidence in CE CY Leung

41%[12]

39%

42%

41%

45%[12]

47+/-3%

+2%

Net approval rate

5%

10%

5%

4%

-4%[12]

-8+/-6%

-4%

[11] All error figures in the table are calculated at 95% confidence level. "95% confidence level" means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Media can state "sampling error of rating not more than +/-1.5, sampling error of percentages not more than +/-3%, sampling error of net approval rates not more than +/-6% at 95% confidence level" when quoting the above figures. The error margin of previous survey can be found at the POP Site.
[12] Such changes have gone beyond the sampling errors at the 95% confidence level, meaning that they are statistically significant prima facie. However, whether numerical differences are statistically significant or not is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful.


Recent popularity figures of the three Secretaries of Departments under the accountability system are summarized below:

 

Date of survey

2-10/4/12

3-10/5/12

30/5-6/6/12

9-11/7/12

2-8/8/12

Latest change [13]

Sample base[13]

523-696

515-538

521-566

529-572

523-563

--

Overall response rate

60.0%

64.6%

63.7%

69.1%

65.9%

--

Latest finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

Finding & error [14]

--

Rating of CS Carrie Lam

--

--

--

64.0

62.0+/-1.8

-2.0[15]

Vote of confidence in CS Carrie Lam

--

--

--

60%

59+/-4%

-1%

Vote of no confidence in CS Carrie Lam

--

--

--

8%

11+/-3%

+3%

Net approval rate

--

--

--

52%

48+/-6%

-4%

Rating of FS John Tsang

49.8

52.7[15]

52.9

56.4[15]

58.1+/-1.5

+1.7[15]

Vote of confidence in FS John Tsang

36%[15]

43%[15]

44%

49%[15]

54+/-4%

+5%[15]

Vote of no confidence in FS John Tsang

26%

19%[15]

16%

16%

13+/-3%

-3%

Net approval rate

10%

24%

28%

33%

41+/-6%

+8%[15]

Rating of SJ Rimsky Yuen

--

--

--

49.0

50.6+/-2.0

+1.6

Vote of confidence in SJ Rimsky Yuen

--

--

--

24%

23+/-4%

-1%

Vote of no confidence in SJ Rimsky Yuen

--

--

--

12%

8+/-2%

-4%[15]

Net approval rate

--

--

--

12%

15+/-5%

+3%

[13] The frequency of this series of questions is different for different questions, and also different from that of CE popularity ratings. Comparisons, if made, should be synchronized using the same intervals. Starting from 2011, these questions only uses sub-samples of the tracking surveys concerned, the sample size for each question also varies.
[14] All error figures in the table are calculated at 95% confidence level. "95% confidence level" means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Media can state "sampling error of various ratings not more than +/-2.0, sampling error of percentages not more than +/-4%, sampling error of net approval rates not more than +/-6% at 95% confidence level" when quoting the above figures. The error margin of previous survey can be found at the POP Site.
[15] Such changes have gone beyond the sampling errors at the 95% confidence level, meaning that they are statistically significant prima facie. However, whether numerical differences are statistically significant or not is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful.

 

Latest popularity figures of Directors of Bureaux under the accountability system are summarized below, in descending order of net approval rates:

Date of survey

30/5-6/6/12

9-11/7/12

2-8/8/12

Latest change

Sample base [16]

514-573

528-606

514-588

--

Overall response rate

63.7%

69.1%

65.9%

--

Sample base for each question/ Percentage of answer

Base

%

Base

%

Base

% & error [17]

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Food and Health Ko Wing-man

--

--

528

69%

531

67+/-4%

-2%

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Food and Health Ko Wing-man

--

--

528

5%

531

5+/-2%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

64%

--

62+/-5%

-2%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Labour and Welfare Matthew Cheung

532

52%

532

64%[18]

538

65+/-4%

+1%

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Labour and Welfare Matthew Cheung

532

12%

532

10%

538

8+/-2%

-2%

Net approval rate

--

40%

--

54%[18]

--

57+/-6%

+3%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury Ceajer Chan

537

31%[18]

584

48%[18]

531

44+/-4%

-4%

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury Ceajer Chan

537

12%

584

8%[18]

531

6+/-2%

-2%

Net approval rate

--

19%

--

40%[18]

--

38+/-5%

-2%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Security Lai Tung-kwok

--

--

542

55%

527

45+/-4%

-10%[18]

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Security Lai Tung-kwok

--

--

542

11%

527

11+/-3%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

44%

--

34+/-6%

-10%[18]

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Transport and Housing Anthony Cheung

--

--

540

46%

514

41+/-4%

-5%[18]

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Transport and Housing Anthony Cheung

--

--

540

11%

514

12+/-3%

+1%

Net approval rate

--

--

--

35%

--

29+/-6%

-6%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Raymond Tam

545

29%[18]

557

37%[18]

542

32+/-4%

-5%[18]

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Raymond Tam

545

13%

557

15%

542

14+/-3%

-1%

Net approval rate

--

16%

--

22%

--

18+/-6%

-4%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for the Civil Service Paul Tang

--

--

541

24%

588

24+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for the Civil Service Paul Tang

--

--

541

7%

588

6+/-2%

-1%

Net approval rate

--

--

--

17%

--

18+/-4%

+1%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Home Affairs Tsang Tak-sing

530

26%

558

37%[18]

530

37+/-4%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Home Affairs Tsang Tak-sing

530

33%

558

31%

530

24+/-4%

-7%[18]

Net approval rate

--

-7%

--

6%[18]

--

13+/-7%

+7%

Vote of confidence in Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing

--

--

562

37%

542

28+/-4%

-9%[18]

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing

--

--

562

9%

542

15+/-3%

+6%[18]

Net approval rate

--

--

--

28%

--

13+/-6%

-15%[18]

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Gregory So

573

18%[18]

549

34%[18]

561

26+/-4%

-8%[18]

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Gregory So

573

17%

549

12%[18]

561

14+/-3%

+2%

Net approval rate

--

1%

--

22%[18]

--

12+/-5%

-10%[18]

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Development Paul Chan[19]

--

--

--

--

529

17+/-3%

--

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Development Paul Chan[19]

--

--

--

--

529

42+/-4%

--

Net approval rate

--

--

--

--

--

-25+/-6%

--

Vote of confidence in Secretary for Education Eddie Ng

--

--

606

33%

527

20+/-3%

-13%[18]

Vote of no confidence in Secretary for Education Eddie Ng

--

--

606

20%

527

48+/-4%

+28%[18]

Net approval rate

--

--

--

13%

--

-28+/-7%

-41%[18]

[16] Starting from 2006, these questions only uses sub-samples of the tracking surveys concerned, the sample size for each question also varies.
[17] All error figures in the table are calculated at 95% confidence level. "95% confidence level" means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times, using the same questions each time but with different random samples, we would expect 95 times getting a figure within the error margins specified. Media can state "sampling error of percentages not more than +/-4% and sampling error of net approval rates not more than +/-7% at 95% confidence level" when quoting the above figures. The error margin of previous survey can be found at the POP Site.
[18] Such changes have gone beyond the sampling errors at the 95% confidence level, meaning that they are statistically significant prima facie. However, whether numerical differences are statistically significant or not is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful.
[19] The government announced the appointment of Paul Chan as the new Secretary for Development on July 30, 2012.

 

The latest survey showed that, CE CY Leung scored 51.6 marks, and 39% supported him as CE, his net approval rate is negative 8 percentage points. Meanwhile, the corresponding ratings of CS Carrie Lam, FS John Tsang and SJ Rimsky Yuen were 62.0, 58.1 and 50.6 marks, and 59%, 54% and 23% would vote for their reappointment correspondingly. Their net approval rates are positive 48, 41 and 15 percentage points respectively.

 

As for the Directors of Bureaux, according to the net approval rates, results revealed that the top position goes to Secretary for Food and Health Ko Wing-man, attaining positive 62 percentage points. The 2nd to 4th places belonged to Secretary for Labour and Welfare Matthew Cheung, Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury Ceajer Chan and Secretary for Security Lai Tung-kwok with net approval rates positive 57, 38 and 34 percentage points respectively. Secretary for Transport and Housing Anthony Cheung, Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Raymond Tam, Secretary for the Civil Service Paul Tang, Secretary for Home Affairs Tsang Tak-sing, Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing, Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Gregory So, Secretary for Development Paul Chan and Secretary for Education Eddie Ng ranked 5th to 12th, their corresponding net approval rates are positive 29, positive 18, positive 18, positive 13, positive 13, positive 12, negative 25 and negative 28 percentage points. In other words, Ko Wing-man and Matthew Cheung scored net approval rates of over 50% among all Directors of Bureaux.

 

 

III. PSI analysis

 

The Public Sentiment Index (PSI) [20] compiled by POP aims at quantifying Hong Kong people’s sentiments, in order to explain and predict the likelihood of collective behaviour. PSI comprises 2 components: one being Government Appraisal (GA) Score and the other being Society Appraisal (SA) Score. GA refers to peoples’ appraisal of society’s governance while SA refers to peoples’ appraisal of the social environment. Both GA and SA scores are compiled from a variety of opinion survey figures. All PSI, GA and SA scores range between 0 to 200, with 100 meaning normal. Please refer to our online material for its methodology. Latest PSI, GA & SA figures in August, per poll, are tabulated as follow:

 

Date of survey (per poll)

9-11/7/12

17-20/7/12

2-8/8/12

Latest change

Sample base

1,000

1,018

1,002

--

Overall response rate

69.1%

65.8%

65.9%

--

Latest finding

Finding

Finding

Finding

--

Public Sentiment Index (PSI)

92.3

84.7

86.0

+1.3

Government Appraisal (GA)

94.8

89.0

90.0

+1.0

Society Appraisal (SA)

95.2

89.9

90.8

+0.9

[20] Public Sentiment Index originates from the “now Survey on Public Sentiment Index" in 2011. It was then sponsored by “NOW News Channel”.


Figures show that the latest Public Sentiment Index (PSI) is 86.0, up 1.3 when compared to that of last survey. As for the Government Appraisal (GA) and Society Appraisal (SA), the scores are 90.0 and 90.8, up 1.0 and 0.9 respectively. As for the monthly change, the preliminary PSI is up 2.5 when compared to last month, the GA down 1.9, the SA is down 1.8 when compared to last month. In other words, there is a slight improvement in the public’s sentiment compared to the last survey.



Commentary

Note: The following commentary was written by Director of POP Robert Chung.

 

After the nomination period for this year’s Legislative Council election is over, 75% of all registered voters managed to tell us the exact month of the election, namely, September. This is much better than four years ago. However, only one-third are aware that they could also vote in the District Council (second) Functional Constituency, so-called “Super DC”, 56% are uncertain, reflecting a low awareness of the election. As for split-voting, only 15% of the voters said they are willing to adopt strategic voting, which is much lower than that registered four years ago.

 

Regarding the popularity of officials, our latest survey shows that the popularity of CE Leung has not changed much compared to two weeks ago, but has significantly dropped compared to one month ago. His net popularity now stands at negative 8 percentage points. As for the Secretaries of Departments, compared to a month ago, the popularity of CS Carrie Lam has slightly dropped, with a net popularity of positive 48 percentage points. She is still the most popular Secretary of Department. The popularity of FS John Tsang has significantly increased, with a net approval rate of positive 41 percentage points. As for SJ Rimsky Yuen, his popularity has not changed much, with a net popularity of positive 15 percentage points.

 

As for the Directors of Bureaux, excluding the newly appointed Secretary for Development Paul Chan, compared to one month ago, the net approval rate of 3 of the 11 Directors have gone up while 8 have gone down. Among them, Secretary for Education Eddie Ng, Secretary for Environment Wong Kam-sing, Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Gregory So and Secretary for Security Lai Tung-kwok have registered changes in net approval rates beyond sampling error, down by 41, 15, 10 and 10 percentage points respectively. Among all the Directors, only Secretary for Development Paul Chan and Secretary for Education Eddie Ng register negative popularity, at negative 25 and 28 percentage points respectively. Secretary for Food and Health Ko Wing-man continues to be the most popular Director.

 

According to POP’s standard, Ko Wing-man falls under the category of “ideal” performer, Matthew Cheung, Carrie Lam and John Tsang now fall under the category of “successful” performer. The performance of Lai Tung-kwok, Ceajer Chan, Anthony Cheung, CY Leung, Tsang Tak-sing, Eddie Ng and Paul Chan can be labeled as “mediocre”, that of Raymond Tam, Wong Kam-sing, Gregory So, Paul Tang and Rimsky Yuen can be labeled as “inconspicuous”. No one falls into the category of “depressing” nor “disastrous”.

 

The following table summarizes the grading of CE and the principal officials for readers' easy reference:

"Ideal": those with approval rates of over 66%; ranked by their approval rates shown inside brackets

Secretary for Food and Health Ko Wing-man (67%)

 

"Successful": those with approval rates of over 50%; ranked by their approval rates shown inside brackets

Secretary for Labour and Welfare Matthew Cheung Kin-chung (65%); CS Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor (59%); FS John Tsang Chun-wah (54%)

 

"Mediocre": those not belonging to other 5 types; ranked by their approval rates shown inside brackets

Secretary for Security Lai Tung-kwok (45%); Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury Ceajer Chan Ka-keung (44%); Secretary for Transport and Housing Anthony Cheung Bing-leung (41%); CE Leung Chun-ying (39%); Secretary for Home Affairs Tsang Tak-sing (37%); Secretary for Education Eddie Ng Hak-kim (20%); Secretary for Development Paul Chan Mo-po (17%)

 

"Inconspicuous": those with recognition rates of less than 50%; ranked by their approval rates; the first figure inside bracket is approval rate while the second figure is recognition rate

Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Raymond Tam Chi-yuen (32%, 46%); Secretary for the Environment Wong Kam-sing (28%, 43%); Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Gregory So Kam-leung (26%, 40%); Secretary for the Civil Service Paul Tang Kwok-wai (24%, 30%); SJ Rimsky Yuen Kwok-keung (23%, 31%)

 

"Depressing": those with disapproval rates of over 50%; ranked by their disapproval rates shown inside brackets

--

 

"Disastrous": those with disapproval rates of over 66%; ranked by their disapproval rates shown inside brackets

--

 



Future Release (Tentative)

  • August 21, 2012 (Tuesday) 1pm to 2pm: Freedom, social and legal indicators


| Special Announcements | Abstract | Latest Figures |Commentary | Future Release (Tentative) |
| Detailed Findings (Popularity of Chief Executive/Popularity of Principal Officials/2012 Legislative Council Election Feature Page) |